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Diversity & Inclusion: Not Just Buzz

Diversity & Inclusion: Not Just Buzz

Diversity and Inclusion have become huge buzz words in the world of work. But they are not just buzz words, organizations are realizing the importance of diversity and inclusion and are focusing on incorporating both into their performance management systems or into their overall strategy.

Diversity & Inclusion: Not Just Buzz

Diversity and Inclusion have become huge buzz words in the world of work. But they are not just buzz words, organizations are realizing the importance of diversity and inclusion and are focusing on incorporating both into their performance management systems or into their overall strategy. In fact, according to Forbes, organizations spend approximately $8 billion dollars on diversity and inclusion efforts (Elsesser, 2019). However, it seems that organizations continue to lag in building a successful diversity and inclusion strategy. So, what can they do to improve their efforts? Understanding what is meant by diversity and inclusion is a key first step.
WHAT IS DIVERSITY? Workplace Diversity is the differences between individuals on any attribute, such as background, experiences

Best Practices for Work-Life Balance

Best Practices for Work-Life Balance

Achievers defines work-life balance as the feeling of being able to manage multiple responsibilities, in both work and non-work life. There should be harmony between the two domains, with the goal of meeting both work and other commitments. According to Sirgy & Lee (2018), work-life

Best Practices for Work-Life Balance

Achievers defines work-life balance as the feeling of being able to manage multiple responsibilities, in both work and non-work life. There should be harmony between the two domains, with the goal of meeting both work and other commitments. According to Sirgy & Lee (2018), work-life balance involves two parts: “(1) role engagement in multiple roles in work and nonwork life and (2) minimal conflict between work and nonwork roles,” (p. 230). Performance should not suffer in one domain because of interference with the other domain.
WHY IS IT IMPORTANT FOR ORGANIZATIONS? An equal work-life balance results in positive outcomes for both work and life. The following outlines some of the positive results of achieving work-life balance (Sirgy & Lee, 2018)

Workplace Coaching

Workplace Coaching

For the past two years, coaching has been named one of the top workplace trends (SIOP Administrative office 2016, 2018). However, coaching is not only a trend; it has become an effective talent management strategy in leadership development and performance management. Despite its popularity

How to Approach Difficult Conversations at Work

For the past two years, coaching has been named one of the top workplace trends (SIOP Administrative office 2016, 2018). However, coaching is not only a trend; it has become an effective talent management strategy in leadership development and performance management. Despite its popularity, there isn’t a lot of clarity surrounding how to coach and why coaching is effective. In this paper, we outline some of the background research on coaching and some best practices for managers.

What is coaching? Coaching “…is a one-to-one learning and development intervention that uses a collaborative, reflective, goal-focused relationship to achieve professional outcome

Difficult Conversations

How to Approach Difficult Conversations at Work

It is inevitable that sometimes we won’t agree or will have an issue we need to be resolved. When this happens, how should you approach the conversation? According to the Harvard Negotiation Project, and the book: “Difficult Conversations: How to Discuss

How to Approach Difficult Conversations at Work

It is inevitable that sometimes we won’t agree or will have an issue we need to be resolved. When this happens, how should you approach the conversation?
According to the Harvard Negotiation Project, and the book: “Difficult Conversations: How to Discuss What Matters Most,” there are three separate conversations embedded in the difficult conversation, that can act as distractors (Stone, Heen, & Patton, 2010). These conversations are about what happened, our feelings, and our identity. This makes it extremely difficult to untangle what is going on between us and someone else.
The three conversations – The “What Happened” Conversation:
Both people have a point of view about

Onboarding

Successful Onboarding

Onboarding sets the stage for an employee’s thoughts and feelings about an organization. In fact, many employees decide to leave an organization within the first 6 months (Maurer, 2015), making onboarding vital for retention. In addition, employees today are more mobile than before, so onboarding has

Successful Onboarding

Onboarding sets the stage for an employee’s thoughts and feelings about an organization. In fact, many employees decide to leave an organization within the first 6 months (Maurer, 2015), making onboarding vital for retention. In addition, employees today are more mobile than before, so onboarding has become a common occurrence (Bauer, Bodner, Erdogan, Truxillo, & Tucker, 2007). According to Bauer et al. (2007), new hires want to reduce uncertainty when starting a new role. To do so, they seek out information and the knowledge they need for the role and about the organization by engaging in organizational socialization tactics, so they can shift from “outsider” to “insider” (Bauer et al., 2007). In Bauer’s et al.’s (2007) meta-analysis, three aspects: role clarity (understanding one’s role

Negative feedback

How to Deal With Negative Feedback

Feedback – giving employees information about their performance (DeNisi & Kluger, 2000) – can help employees change and develop. However, this doesn’t always happen. Kluger and DeNisi (1996) found that only 1/3 of feedback interventions resulted in behavioural change

How to Deal With Negative Feedback

Feedback – giving employees information about their performance (DeNisi & Kluger, 2000) – can help employees change and develop. However, this doesn’t always happen. Kluger and DeNisi (1996) found that only 1/3 of feedback interventions resulted in behavioral change. This is especially probable when giving negative feedback. Negative feedback can produce a host of defensive reactions, resulting in rejection of the feedback and subsequent lack of performance change. So, how can negative feedback have the intended impact?
Why do we avoid negative feedback? We first need to understand why people so often recoil from negative feedback. Part of the explanation is that employees often make sense of negative feedback in terms of

Employee Engagement

How To Approach Engagement To Actually Make a Difference

Organizations today recognize how important it is that their employees are engaged. However, the way organizations have approached engagement hasn’t actually helped to facilitate employee engagement. According to Gallup (2017)

How To Approach Engagement To Actually Make a Difference

Organizations today recognize how important it is that their employees are engaged. However, the way organizations have approached engagement hasn’t actually helped to facilitate employee engagement. According to Gallup (2017), only 15% of employees are engaged at work. Organizations need to do a better job of measuring and acting on engagement. How? By incorporating the fundamental pillars behind employee engagement.
Engagement Pillars – What is engagement? Achievers defines engagement as the extent to which individuals are advocates of, committed to, and enthusiastic about their work. How engaged employees are impacts the

Employee Recognition

A Case For Recognition: Employees Want It, And Organizations Need To Prioritize It

Employees were asked to rank order what they want at work from most to least important (Nelson, 1996). Often items, employees rated appreciation of their work as number one. Despite being of great importance to employees, managers predicted

A Case For Recognition: Employees Want It, And Organizations Need To Prioritize It

Employees were asked to rank order what they want at work from most to least important (Nelson, 1996). Often items, employees rated appreciation of their work as number one. Despite being of great importance to employees, managers predicted that appreciation would be the least important factor to employees. This suggests that recognition is often overlooked as a support tool by managers. Should it be? The short answer is ‘No,’ recognition is a critical engagement factor that should be incorporated into every organization’s talent management strategy. Employees want recognition but, more importantly, recognition is associated with job satisfaction and retention (Khowaja, Merchant, & Hirani, 2005)